Research Papers

Public Transportation and Reserved Lanes: Do they Improve the Safety of Montrealers?

Filename 4B_3_Strauss_Paper.pdf
Filesize 816 KB
Version 1
Date added June 27, 2017
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Category 2017 CARSP XXVII Toronto
Tags Research and Evaluation, Session 4B
Author/Auteur Jillian Strauss, Patrick Morency, Catherine Morency
Stream/Volet Research and Evaluation

Slidedeck Presentation

4B_3_Strauss

Abstract

In urban environments, public transportation has the ability to improve the safety of populations since the risk of injury and fatality during public transit trips are much lower than during car trips. While some studies have estimated injury and fatality rates for bus occupants, the data was aggregated to the country level and no distinction was made between public transit and other bus types. Furthermore, previous research is unable to describe the influence of road infrastructure designed for public transit (such as reserved bus lanes) and has not considered the risk of injury associated with the walking portion of public transit trips, to and from transit access points. This research aims to estimate and compare the risk of injury for car and bus users in the Montreal Metropolitan Area, and will take into consideration the risk of injury associated with the walking portion of transit trips, as well as the influence of road infrastructure (for example, reserved bus lanes). This work will also investigate and compare the number of pedestrian and cyclist injuries per kilometre travelled by car and by bus. This work focuses on the entire Montreal Metropolitan Area (MMA) road network where at least one bus route runs. The estimated volumes of car and bus occupants were obtained for each road by running route assignment from the 2008 origin-destination survey for this region. Injury data was extracted from the Quebec police report database, a source of data that makes it possible to identify the type of vehicle occupied and/or involved in each accident. Characteristics of the road network, such as presence of reserved bus lanes, road width and presence of median, will also be considered in the analysis. Injury rates associated with car and bus travel will be calculated for vehicle occupants, pedestrians and cyclists. Injury rate ratios will be computed and compared. This research will provide disaggregated estimates of car and bus occupant volumes at the street-level. The results will show the rate of injury associated with car and bus trips, including injuries associated with the walking portion of public transit trips. The results will quantify pedestrian and cyclist injuries associated with both car and bus travel. Fatal and severe injury rates will also be computed. The results will explore the influence of road infrastructure, e.g. reserved bus lanes, on injury rates for all modes. This research will enable a better understanding of the health benefits for the entire population linked to public transit use. This work will also be able to identify the safest routes for the different road users as well as quantify the effects of reserved bus lanes and other road infrastructure on the safety of all road users. This study achieved its objectives of comparing vehicle occupant, pedestrian and cyclist injuries associated with car and bus travel. This study also considered the effects of road infrastructure on the safety of all road users.

Jillian Strauss, Patrick Morency, Catherine Morency