Research Papers

Is Street Racing a Problem? Results from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey

Filename Vingilis.pdf
Filesize 275 KB
Version 1
Date added June 6, 2010
Downloaded 1 time/fois
Category 2010 CMRSC XX Niagara
Tags Session 6B
Author/Auteur Evelyn Vingilis, Reg Smart, Robert Mann, Angela Paglia-Boak, Gina Stoduto, Jane Seeley

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the prevalence of self-reported street racing and its relationship to drug use, and other risky and illegal activities among a representative Ontario sample of school students.
Method: The Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) is population-based survey of Ontario students in grades 7 to 12. This self-administered, anonymous survey is conducted across the province every two years with the purpose of identifying epidemiological trends in student drug use, mental health, physical activity, and risky and illegal activities, as well as identifying risk and protective factors. The 2009 OSDUHS data were examined for prevalence of self-reported street racing and correlates. For the current study only students in grades 9-12 were included.
Results: The sample of students in grades 9-12 that completed the questionnaire with the street racing question was 3,053. All survey estimates were weighted, and variance and statistical tests were corrected for the sampling design. Overall, 5.6% of students in grades 9-12, reported driving a car, truck or SUV in a street race in the last 12 months. Street racers were more likely to be male, in higher grades, getting lower marks in school, drinkers, drinking drivers, cannabis users and engaging in illegal, delinquent activities, such as joy riding, theft and assault.
Conclusions: This study is the first in Canada to examine self-reported street racing and correlates among students. It suggests that street racers engage in drug use and a range of delinquent activities.

Evelyn Vingilis, Reg Smart, Robert Mann, Angela Paglia-Boak, Gina Stoduto and Jane Seeley