Research Papers

Everyday driving violations of car and racing enthusiasts in Ontario, Canada

Filename 7B-Yildirim-Yenier_FP_Everyday-Driving-Violations-of-Car-and-Racing-Enthusiasts-in-Ontario-Canada.pdf
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Date added June 17, 2014
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Category 2014 CMRSC XXIV Vancouver
Tags Research and Evaluation, Session 7B
Author/Auteur Zümrüt Yıldırım-Yenier, Evelyn Vingilis, and Jane Seeley
Stream/Volet Research and Evaluation

Slidedeck Presentation

7B Yildirim-Yenier_Everyday Driving Violations of Car and Racing Enthusiasts in Ontario, Canada

Abstract

Background: High risk driving behaviours, such as stunt driving and street racing, of car and
racing enthusiasts have recently been investigated. Though most enthusiasts reported not
engaging in high risk driving, it was shown that positive attitudes towards street racing,
personality variables such as driver thrill seeking, and other self-reported risky driving
behaviours were associated with high risk driving. However, how these risk-related correlates
are associated with everyday driving violations (i.e., ordinary and aggressive violations), and in
turn, with negative outcomes (i.e., collisions and driving offence citations) have remained mainly
unexamined. This study aimed to investigate the relationships among car and racing
enthusiasts` risky driving attitudes, everyday driving violations, collisions and offence citations.
Method: A web-based survey was conducted among members and visitors of car club and
racing websites in Ontario, Canada. Data were obtained from 503 participants. The
questionnaire included: (i) attitudes towards Ontario’s new legislation about street racing/stunt
driving; general attitudes towards street racing/stunt driving; and comparison of street racing
with other risky driving behaviours; (ii) self-reported driving violations (i.e., ordinary violations
and aggressive violations); (iii) self-reported collisions in last five years and offence citations in
past year; (iv) background questions. The relationships among the concerned variables were
tested via structural equation modeling.
Results: Findings indicated that attitudes towards street racing/stunt driving predicted driving
violations, which in turn, predicted negative outcomes. Detailed analysis showed that attitudes
towards legislation about street racing/stunt driving negatively and general attitudes towards
street racing/stunt driving positively predicted ordinary violations, which in turn, predicted
offence citations. Moreover, general attitudes towards street racing/stunt driving positively
predicted aggressive violations, which in turn, predicted offence citations.
Discussion: The findings indicate that positive attitudes toward street racing/stunt driving may
be transferring to general driving behaviours as measured by self-reported ordinary and
aggressive driving violations which mediate offence citations.

Zümrüt Yıldırım-Yenier, Evelyn Vingilis, and Jane Seeley