Research Papers

Effectiveness of In-Vehicle Moose Warning Modalities, an Experimental Study

Filename Paper-05-Varden.pdf
Filesize 440 KB
Version 1
Date added June 11, 2006
Downloaded 1 time/fois
Category 2006–CMRSC-XVI–Winnipeg
Tags Dr. Charles H. Miller Award Winner, Session 6A
Author/Auteur Abdelsalam W, Desroches P, Famewo J, Nonnecke B, Varden A
Award/Prix Dr. Charles H. Miller

Abstract

Julie Famewo, Andrew Varden, Pierre Desroches

Julie Famewo, Andrew Varden, Pierre Desroches

Animal-vehicle collisions are very common worldwide, causing injury or death to numerous animals and hundreds of humans each year. In North America, hitting a moose is much more severe than other large animals. These accidents are caused by detection errors that may be overcome by use of an in-vehicle warning system. Several infrared early warning systems already exist for the detection of pedestrians and other hard to perceive critical obstacles. Determining the most effective way to deliver warning information to drivers is key to increasing safety. Our driving simulation study examines the effectiveness of presenting warnings in the auditory and visual modalities with the goal of reducing moose hit rates. Both auditory and visual warnings caused drivers to gradually reduce their velocity which prevented collisions, without showing any significant difference between modality types.

Abdelsalam W, Desroches P, Famewo J, Nonnecke B, Varden A