Research Papers

Countermeasures to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Canada: The Way Forward

Filename FINAL-PAPER-61.docx
Filesize 43 KB
Version 1
Date added June 10, 2012
Downloaded 5 times/fois
Category 2012 CMRSC XXII Banff
Tags Session 3A
Author/Auteur Neil Arason, Leanna Belluz, Paul Boase, Ediriweera Desapriya, Robert Dewar, Christine Eisan, Kristen Gane, Christine Miller, Sarah Peddie, Valerie Todd, Jean Wilson, Mustapha Zayoun

Abstract

On average about 340 pedestrians are killed annually on Canadian roads. Research findings and experience of other jurisdictions indicate that vast progress could be made to reduce the number of pedestrians killed and injured in Canada if pedestrian safety were given higher priority and if proven measures were implemented. There are many ways that pedestrian injury can be prevented or mitigated in a road system shared with motor vehicles. In the modern era of road transportation, jurisdictions should assume a safe system approach and include pedestrians and other vulnerable road users as an essential component of the system.

To address this opportunity, a multi-disciplinary expert working group was formed through the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) to review, evaluate and summarize countermeasures covering four themes: safer pedestrians, safer drivers, safer road and traffic signal design, and safer vehicles, as each relates to pedestrian safety outcomes. The working group started from a safe system approach which recognizes that the most vulnerable part of the system is the unprotected human being, and that the system has to be designed around them. Countermeasures were examined for their effectiveness in reducing pedestrian collisions and conflicts with motor vehicles. The countermeasures and their supporting research are described in a report which will be made available on the CCMTA website in summer, 2012. The list of initiatives that have demonstrated effectiveness or show promise but have insufficient data is intended to assist jurisdictions and road safety stakeholders in developing their own unique road safety action plans and strategies. The list of countermeasures will be reviewed by the Expert Working Group for inclusion into the inventory of proven and promising initiatives in Canada's Road Safety Strategy 2015. This paper describes the origins, context and motivation for the report, the key themes and its purpose.

Neil Arason, Leanna Belluz, Paul Boase, Ediriweera Desapriya, Robert Dewar, Christine Eisan, Kristen Gane, Christine Miller, Sarah Peddie, Valerie Todd, Jean Wilson, Mustapha Zayoun