Research Papers

An analysis of injuries and police statistics in Wetaskiwin, Alberta after an amended bylaw on liquor sales hours.

Version 1
Date added July 29, 2015
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Category 2015 CARSP XXV Ottawa
Tags Research and Evaluation, Session 6C
Author/Auteur J. Randall, D. Voaklander, K. L. Belton
Stream/Volet Research and Evaluation

Slidedeck Presentation Only (no paper submitted)

6C - Belton

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol is a significant factor in the occurrence of injuries in Canada (Thomas, 2004,; Lea, Black, and Asbridge, 2009). Alcohol restriction has some support in the scientific community as an intervention that can reduce the rate of injuries associated with alcohol impairment but the effect size of alcohol restriction on injury rates is uncertain. The purpose of this research is to examine the impact of an alcohol restriction bylaw on violence, vehicular collisions and impaired driving in Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

This study examines the effects of alcohol restriction policies in Wetaskiwin, AB with respect to injuries and criminal activities. Specifically, it will examine potentially alcohol-related incidents such as motor vehicle collisions and violence (including self-directed violence) that occurred in the city both before and after the introduction of alcohol restriction by-laws.
METHODS

This study compared rates prior to and after the intervention from the RCMP service on incident reports for violence/assaults and motor-vehicle collisions as well emergency department presentations due to injuries for the years 2006-2010. These data were also compared to a similar town that was in close proximity to Wetaskiwin. Outcomes of interest will be injuries; specifically transport-related injuries, and violence-related injuries.
RESULTS

Between 2006 and 2010, controlling for other parameters there was:
• 10% reduced chance that an individual would report to and emergency department for treatment of non-traffic related reasons post intervention.
• 9% reduced chance that an individual would report to an emergency department for treatment of assault post intervention.
• 49% reduced chance that an individual would report to an emergency department for treatment of self-harm post intervention.
• 6% reduced chance that a person would be involved in a motor vehicle collision.
• 34% reduced chance that a person would be involved in an impaired driving charge.
• 7% increased chance that a person would be involved in an assault charge.
DISCUSSION

For the majority of indicators identified in this study, it appears that a modest improvement in violence and traffic related parameters has been observed. This is consistent with other research examining hours-restriction in on-premise drinking establishments (Hahn et al. 2010; Duallibi et al., 2007) and off-sales establishments (including liquor stores) (Henderson- Yates et al., 2008; Gray et al., 1998; Brady 2000, D’Abbs and Togni 2000).

 

CONCLUSIONS

In conclusion we observed significant reductions in enforcement and health related statistics in the post by law period. Further study will determine the long term impact of this intervention.

J. Randall, D. Voaklander, K. L. Belton