Research Papers

Age Group Differences in Self-Reported Road Rage Perpetration and Victimization

Filename Wickens-Mann.pdf
Filesize 183 KB
Version 1
Date added June 6, 2010
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Category 2010 CMRSC XX Niagara
Tags Session 6B
Author/Auteur Christine M. Wickens, Robert E. Mann, Gina Stoduto, Anca Ialomiteanu, Reginald G. Smart

Abstract

Aim: This study examined whether the predictors of self-reported road rage perpetration and victimization vary across age groups.
Method: Based on data from a general-population telephone survey conducted from July 2002 through June 2005, three groups of drivers were examined: 18-34 year olds (n=1522), 35-54 year olds (n=2726), and 55 years of age or older (n=1883). For each age group sample, logistic regression analyses examined self-reported road rage perpetration and victimization in the last 12 months by measures of driving exposure, binge drinking, cannabis use, and drinking-driving, while controlling for demographic factors.
Results: The prevalence of road rage perpetration within the past year was highest for the youngest age group (51%), followed by the middle-aged group (37%), and then the oldest age group (18%). The same pattern of results was found for prevalence of road rage victimization (54%, 47%, and 31%, respectively). Controlling for demographic factors, the predictors of perpetration were generally consistent across the age groups. The logistic regression model for the youngest drivers revealed that those who reported stressful driving, binge drinking, and cannabis use had significantly increased odds of reporting road rage perpetration. For middle- aged and older drivers, stressful driving, driving on busy roads, cannabis use, and driving after drinking were associated with perpetration. In addition, increased mileage contributed to perpetration in the oldest group. The findings for road rage victimization were similar. The logistic regression model for the youngest age group identified stressful driving, cannabis use, and higher annual mileage as being associated with victimization. For the oldest age group, these same variables were significant predictors of victimization, in addition to driving on busy roads. The logistic regression for the middle-aged group identified the same predictors as that of the oldest age group; however, interestingly driving after drinking was found to predict lower victimization among middle-aged drivers.
Conclusions: Although the prevalence of road rage perpetration and victimization declined with age, the factors that contributed to road rage remained generally stable across the lifespan. The results suggest that efforts to reduce road rage among young drivers may prove to be effective for drivers from all age groups.

Christine M. Wickens, Robert E. Mann, Gina Stoduto, Anca Ialomiteanu and Reginald G. Smart